Introduction

If you thought cats were only good for curling up in your lap, purring, and inspiring Internet memes, think again! Cats can also be excellent companion animals. And one way to ensure the health of both you and your cat is by brushing their teeth on a regular basis.

Your cat may still be at risk for gingivitis, which can cause painful inflammation of the gums and can lead to other dental issues.

If you don't brush your cat's teeth, they're still at risk for gingivitis. Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused by plaque buildup and bacteria. If left untreated, it can lead to other dental issues like tooth loss, abscesses (pus pockets), and periodontal disease.

Gingivitis can be treated with a variety of methods such as daily brushing or even surgery if necessary. Once treated, the gum tissue needs to be monitored regularly so that any potential flare-ups can be caught early on before becoming serious issues.

You should also ensure that your cats are eating a diet low in sugar content because this can also contribute to dental health problems later in life.

If your cat is a senior, it's even more important to keep up with their dental health, as cats are more likely to have gum disease in their old age.

If your cat is a senior, it's even more important to keep up with their dental health, as cats are more likely to have gum disease in their old age. Keep an eye on the redness or swelling of their gums, and schedule a cleaning at your vet if you notice any bleeding.

If your cat has already had a dental cleaning before they were two years old, they're at lower risk for developing periodontal disease than cats who haven't been professionally cleaned yet.

Plaque can also be a problem for cats if not caught early.

Plaque, in the form of a sticky, colorless film that forms on teeth, can be a problem for cats if not caught early. It is this plaque that leads to gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums. This condition can progress to periodontal disease if left untreated.

In humans and other animals with lower-jaw teeth (molars), plaque accumulates between teeth and under the gum line leading to inflammation and eventually tooth loss if not treated promptly. Since cats don’t have molars, they are less prone than humans are to periodontal disease; however, their most vulnerable area is where you would find your canine tooth in us—it’s called the premolar!

If you see red or swollen gums or especially if you notice bleeding gums or loose teeth, schedule a cleaning at the vet.

If you see red or swollen gums, especially if you notice bleeding gums or loose teeth, it's time to schedule a visit with your vet. Don't wait until the problem gets worse.

If your cat is a senior (over 8) and has been eating dry food for most of its life, it's particularly important that you get regular cleanings done by the vet. The older dry food sticks to their teeth and around the gum line so much easier than wet food does because of all those added chemicals in them like dyes etc., which just make everything worse on an older kitty!

How do you know when your cat has dental problems?

How do you know when your cat has dental problems? There are several signs to look for:

  • Red or swollen gums. If your cat's gum tissue is inflamed, they may also feel sore.
  • Loose teeth. A cat with loose teeth will probably have difficulty chewing food and may drool excessively because of it.
  • Tartar buildup on their teeth. Tartar (calculus) is a hard yellow-brown deposit that forms on the surface of their teeth as they age, which can lead to tooth decay if not brushed away regularly by a veterinarian or groomer who knows what they're doing!

You had to know this was coming, but one of the best ways to ensure your cat's dental health is by brushing their teeth regularly. Just like with people, regular brushing helps prevent plaque buildup.

We have to assume that you knew this was coming, but one of the best ways to ensure your cat's dental health is by brushing their teeth regularly. Just like with people, regular brushing helps prevent plaque buildup and gum disease.

Luckily, it's not hard to brush a cat's teeth at all! There are toothbrushes specifically made for cats that can be bought from pet supply stores (or online) and will make the job more manageable for you. You may also consider using a finger brush if you're not comfortable with an actual toothbrush; these work just as well and are much easier to handle than having a long-handled one in your hand while trying to hold onto your cat at the same time!

There are plenty of toothbrushes marketed specifically for cats (some of them even look like little mittens!) so try one out and see if you can get your feline friend used to it.

If you're eager to get started right away, there are plenty of toothbrushes marketed specifically for cats (some of them even look like little mittens!) so try one out and see if you can get your feline friend used to it. Most cats will tolerate brushing once they're familiar with the process. If not, don't despair! There are lots of other ways that you can help keep your cat's teeth healthy and clean.

Brushing your cat's teeth is an important part of keeping them healthy, but it isn't enough on its own. It's also important to make sure that your cat has a good diet and gets regular check-ups from a veterinarian who knows about dental health in cats.

As an alternative to brushing, there are also several brands of toothpaste made specifically for cats that come in flavors they like and are easy to administer (even without needing a brush).

As an alternative to brushing, there are also several brands of toothpaste made specifically for cats that come in flavors they like and are easy to administer (even without needing a brush). These products can be found at pet supply stores or online.

As with humans, the longer you wait to start brushing your cat's teeth, the more work it will be to maintain their dental health. The best time to start is when your cat is young so they get used to having their mouths cleaned regularly.

There are also sprays and water additives that help freshen breath and clean teeth. Look into what might work best for your kitty!

To make the process easier, you can use a toothbrush designed specifically for cats. These brushes are soft and gentle on your cat's mouth and gums. They also have little nubs or bristles that will clean between their teeth and get deep into their mouth if you're using one of these options:

  • Water additive
  • Water additive with flavor (usually chicken)

If your cat is resistant to having his teeth brushed, start by introducing him to the water additive or water additive with flavor before attempting to brush his teeth. The added liquid will help take away some of the taste in his mouth and make it easier for him to accept brushing time in general.

Your cat will thank you.

If you’re the kind of cat owner who likes to show your love for your pet in a way that directly benefits their health, then this is the article for you. Brushing your cat’s teeth can help prevent serious dental issues and vastly improve their overall health. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they need meat as their primary source of protein. However, unlike humans who have evolved over time to be able to digest different foods (like fruits and vegetables), cats have remained true to their carnivorous roots throughout history. This means that when we feed our cats dry food or treats made with grains instead of meat sources like chicken or duck carcasses, it can cause them digestive problems—like constipation!

Conclusion

If you are a cat owner, it’s imperative that you keep your feline friend's teeth in good health. The reason? Dental disease is one of the most common health issues for cats, and it can lead to serious problems like infections and pain if left untreated. Luckily, there are many ways to help make sure your kitten has strong teeth and gums. If they're still young enough (under two years old), get them used to having their teeth brushed with a soft-bristled toothbrush twice or thrice weekly; if they're older than this age range then simply use an at-home cleaning kit which includes some sort of paste or gel made specifically for felines!